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Query: "keywords" (undifferentiated autoinflammatory disease) .

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1.
Somatic mutations and the risk of undifferentiated autoinflammatory disease in MDS : an under-recognized but prognostically important complication
Abdulla Watad, Mark Kačar, Nicola Luigi Bragazzi, Qiao Zhou, Miriam Jassam, Jan Taylor, Eve Roman, Alexandra Smith, Richard A. Jones, Howard Amital, 2021

Abstract: Objectives: We theorized that myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with somatic mutations and karyotype abnormalities are associated with autoinflammation, and that the presence of autoinflammatory disease affected prognosis in MDS. Methods: One hundred thirty-four MDS patients were assessed for the prevalence of autoinflammatory complications and its link with karyotypes and somaticmutation status. Autoinflammatory complications were described either as well-defined autoinflammatory diseases (AD) or undifferentiated "autoinflammatory disease" (UAD) (defined as CRP over 10.0 mg/L on five consecutive occasions, taken at separate times and not explained by infection). Several patient characteristics including demographic, clinical, laboratory, cytogenetics charts, and outcomes, were compared between different groups. Results: Sixty-two (46.3%) patients had an autoinflammatory complication manifesting as arthralgia (43.5% vs. 23.6%, p = 0.0146), arthritis (30.6% vs. 15.3%, p = 0.0340), skin rash (27.4% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.0301), pleuritis (14.5% vs. 4.2%, p = 0.0371) and unexplained fever (27.4% vs. 0%, p < 0.0001). AD were found in 7.4% of MDS patients (with polymyalgia rheumatic being the most frequently one). Classical autoimmune diseases were found only in 4 MDS patients (3.0%). Transcription factor pathway mutations (RUNX1, BCOR, WTI, TP53) (OR 2.20 [95%CI 1.02-4.75], p = 0.0451) and abnormal karyotypes (OR 2.76 [95%CI 1.22-6.26], p = 0.0153) were associated with autoinflammatory complications. Acute leukaemic transformation was more frequent in MDS patients with autoinflammatory features than those without (27.4% vs. 9.7%, p = 0.0080). Conclusions: Autoinflammatory complications are common inMDS. Somatic mutations of transcription factor pathways and abnormal karyotypes are associated with greater risk of autoinflammatory complications, which are themselves linked to malignant transformation and a worse prognosis.
Keywords: myelodysplastic syndromes - genetics, autoinflammation, undifferentiated autoinflammatory disease, molecular characterization, somatic mutations
DiRROS - Published: 31.03.2021; Views: 576; Downloads: 352
.pdf Fulltext (684,58 KB)

2.
Mixed results with baricitinib in biological-resistant adult-onset Still's disease and undifferentiated systemic autoinflammatory disease
Mark Kačar, John Fitton, Andrew K Gough, Maya H Buch, Dennis McGonagle, Sinisa Savic, 2020

Abstract: This clinical case series describes our experience with the use of Janus kinase 1/2 inhibitor baricitinib in two patients suffering from refractory adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) as well as in one case suffering from AOSD-like autoinflammatory disease in the context of myelodysplastic syndrome. All patients suffered from disease nonresponsive to conventional Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) as well as biological therapies including interleukin (IL)-1 and IL-6 blockade, relying instead on high daily doses of prednisolone. We also report the first case of Pneumocystis jirovecii infection following baricitinib use.
Keywords: adult onset Still's disease -- drug therapy, ankylosing spondylitis, arthritis, antirheumatic agents, undifferentiated systemic autoinflammatory disease, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs
DiRROS - Published: 08.04.2021; Views: 659; Downloads: 399
.pdf Fulltext (321,22 KB)

3.
Hereditary systemic autoinflammatory diseases and Schnitzler's syndrome
Mark Kačar, Shelly Pathak, Sinisa Savic, 2019

Abstract: The systemic autoinflammatory diseases are disorders of the innate immune system distinguished by severe inflammation resulting from dysregulation of the innate immune system. Hereditary fever syndromes, such as FMF, TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes and mevalonate kinase deficiency, were the first group of systemic autoinflammatory diseases for which a genetic basis was established, between 1999 and 2001. Currently according to the latest report of the international union of immunological societies, 37 separate monogenic disorders were classified as autoinflammatory. In addition to the abovementioned monogenic conditions, we describe Schnitzler's syndrome, a well-defined, acquired autoinflammatory condition without a clear genetic basis. For the purposes of this review, we discuss several conditions defined by the latest consensus process as systemic autoinflammatory diseases. We focus on those disorders where recent studies have contributed to further phenotypic characterization or had an impact on clinical management.
Keywords: pyrin, Schnitzler syndrome, haploinsufficiency, autoinflammatory diseases, pyrin-associated autoinflammatory diseases, NLRP3-related autoinflammatory diseases, undifferentiated systemic autoinflammatory disease, relopathies
DiRROS - Published: 08.04.2021; Views: 625; Downloads: 448
.pdf Fulltext (455,31 KB)

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