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1.
Noninvasive ventilation : education and training. A narrative analysis and an international consensus document
Karen E. A. Burns, Habib Mohammad Reazaul Karim, Irena Šarc, Jean-Michel Arnal, Vito Antonio Falcone, Szymon Skoczyński, Thierry Hernández-Gilsoul, Nicola Vargas, Antonello Nicolini, Mohamad F. El-Khatib, Laura D. Ciobanu, 2019

Abstract: Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is an increasingly used method of respiratory support. The use of NIV is expanding over the time and if properly applied, it can save patients’ lives and improve long-term prognosis. However, both knowledge and skills of its proper use as life support are paramount. This systematic review aimed to assess the importance of NIV education and training. Literature search was conducted (MEDLINE: 1990 to June, 2018) to identify randomized controlled studies and systematic reviews with the results analyzed by a team of experts across the world through e-mail based communications. Clinical trials examining the impact of education and training in NIV as the primary objective was not found. A few studies with indirect evidence, a simulation-based training study, and narrative reviews were identified. Currently organized training in NIV is implemented only in a few developed countries. Due to a lack of high-grade experimental evidence, an international consensus on NIV education and training based on opinions from 64 experts across the twenty-one different countries of the world was formulated. Education and training have the potential to increase knowledge and skills of the clinical staff who deliver medical care using NIV. There is a genuine need to develop structured, organized NIV education and training programs, especially for the developing countries.
Keywords: noninvasive ventilation -- education, health personnel -- education, training, staff
DiRROS - Published: 22.10.2020; Views: 285; Downloads: 117
.pdf Fulltext (258,13 KB)

2.
Systemic and airway oxidative stress in competitive swimmers
Sabina Škrgat, Peter Korošec, Izidor Kern, Mira Šilar, Julij Šelb, Matjaž Fležar, Robert Marčun, 2018

Abstract: Background: The environment in swimming pools, which contain chlorine, might interact with the airway epithelium, resulting in oxidative stress and/or inflammation during high intensity training periods. Methods: We evaluated pulmonary functional (metacholine challenge test, FEV1 and VC), cellular (eosinophils and neutrophils), inflammatory (FeNo, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-[alpha]), oxidative (8-isoprostanes) and angiogenesis factors (VEGF) in induced sputum and peripheral blood of 41 healthy non-asthmatic elite swimmers (median 16 years) during the period of high intensity training before a national championship. The second paired sampling was performed seven months later after training had been stopped for one month. Results: There was a ten-fold increase (median 82-924 pg/ml; P < 0.001) in 8-isoprostanes in induced sputum and five-fold increase (median 82-924 pg/ml; P < 0.001) in sera during training in comparison to the period of rest. However, there was no difference in FEV1 (113 vs 116%), VC (119 vs 118%), FeNo (median 34 vs 38 ppb), eosinophils (2.7 vs 2.9% in sputum; 180 vs 165 cells/[micro]l in blood), neutrophils, different cytokines or VEGF in induced sputum or sera. The only exception was TNF-[alpha], which was moderately increased in sera (median 23 vs 40 pg/ml; P=0.02) during the peak training period. Almost half (18 of 41) of swimmers showed bronchial hyperresponsiveness during the peak training period (PC20 cutoff was 4 mg/ml). There was no correlation between hyperresponsiveness and the markers of oxidative stress or inflammation. Conclusions: High intensity training in healthy, non-asthmatic competitive swimmers results in marked oxidative stress at the airway and systemic levels, but does not lead to airway inflammation. However, we could not confirm that oxidative stress is associated with bronchial hyperresponsiveness (AHR), which is often observed during the peak exercise training period.
Keywords: bronchial diseases, swimming, oxidative stress, bronchial hyperresponsiveness, competitive swimmers, training
DiRROS - Published: 23.11.2020; Views: 289; Downloads: 112

3.
Additional exergames to regular tennis training improves cognitive-motor functions of children but may temporarily affect tennis technique : a single-blind randomized controlled trial
Luka Šlosar, Eling D. de Bruin, Eduardo Bodnariuc Fontes, Matej Plevnik, Rado Pišot, Boštjan Šimunič, Uroš Marušič, 2021

Abstract: This study evaluated the effects of an exergame program (TennisVirtua-4, Playstation Kinect) combined with traditional tennis training on autonomic regulation, tennis technique, gross motor skills, clinical reaction time, and cognitive inhibitory control in children. Sixty-three children were randomized into four groups (1st % two exergame and two regular trainings sessions/week, 2nd % one exergame and one regular training sessions/week, 3rd % two regular trainings sessions/week, and 4th % one regular training session/week) and compared at baseline, 6-month immediately post intervention and at 1-year follow-up post intervention. At 6-month post intervention the combined exergame and regular training sessions revealed: higher breathing frequency, heart rate (all ps % 0.001) and lower skin conductance levels (p = 0.001) during exergaming; additional benefits in the point of contact and kinetic chain elements of the tennis forehand and backhand technique (all ps % 0.001); negative impact on the shot preparation and the follow-through elements (all ps % 0.017); higher ball skills (as part of the gross motor skills) (p < 0.001); higher percentages of clinical reaction time improvement (1st %9.7% vs 3rd group %7.4% and 2nd %6.6% vs 4th group %4.4%, all ps % 0.003) and cognitive inhibitory control improvement in both congruent (1st %20.5% vs 3rd group %18.4% and 2nd %11.5% vs 4th group %9.6%, all ps % 0.05) and incongruent (1st group %19.1% vs 3rd group %12.5% and 2nd group %11.4% vs 4th group %6.5%, all ps % 0.001) trials. The 1-year follow-up test showed no differences in the tennis technique, clinical reaction time and cognitive inhibitory control improvement between groups with the same number of trainings per week. The findings support exergaming as an additional training tool, aimed to improve important cognitive-motor tennis skills by adding dynamics to the standardized training process. Caution should be placed to planning this training, e.g., in a mesocycle, since exergaming might decrease the improvement of specific tennis technique parts of the trainees. (ClinicalTrials.gov; ID: NCT03946436).
Keywords: tennis, training, performance, children, motor learning, cognitive learning, teaching, strategies
DiRROS - Published: 17.03.2021; Views: 106; Downloads: 67
.pdf Fulltext (1,81 MB)

4.
Higher neural demands on stimulus processing after prolonged hospitalization can be mitigated by a cognitively stimulating environment
Uroš Marušič, Rado Pišot, Voyko Kavcic, 2021

Abstract: Prolonge d periods of complete physical inactivity or bed rest trigger various alterations in the functional and metabolic levels of the human body. However, bed rest-related adaptations of the central nervous system are less known and thoroughly studied. The aim of this study was to investigate brain electrophysiological changes using event-related potentials (ERPs) after 14 days of bed rest and 12 consecutive sessions of computerized cognitive training (CCT). Sixteen older (Mage= 60 years) healthy volunteers were randomly divided into a CCT treatment group and an active control group. All participants performed ERP measurements based on the foveal visual presentation of a circle on a black background before and after bed rest. After 14 days of bed rest, participants in the control group showed increased peak P1 amplitude (p = .012), decreased P1 latency (p = .024), and increased P2 amplitude (p = .036), while the CCT group also showed decreased P1 latency (p = .023) and decreased P2 latency (p = .049). Our results suggest that, even from a central adaptation perspective, prolonged periods of physical inactivity or bed rest trigger additional neural recruitment and should therefore be minimized, and that CCT may serve as a tool to mitigate this. Future research should focus on other aspects of central nervous system adaptation following periods of immobilization/hospitalization to improve our knowledge of infl uence of physical inactivity and its eff ects on cortical activity and to develop appropriate countermeasures to mitigate functional dysregulation.
Keywords: aging, physical inactivity, immobilization, electroencephalography, EEG, computerized cognitive training
DiRROS - Published: 13.05.2021; Views: 5; Downloads: 4
.pdf Fulltext (820,21 KB)

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