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1.
Risk factors for systemic reactions in typical cold urticaria : results from the COLD-CE study
Mojca Bizjak, Mitja Košnik, Dejan Dinevski, Simon Francis Thomsen, Daria Fomina, Elena Borzova, Kanokvalai Kulthanan, Raisa Meshkova, Dalia Melina Ahsan, Mona Al-Ahmad, Jovan Miljković, Dorothea Terhorst, Marcus Maurer, 2022, original scientific article

Abstract: Background. Cold urticaria (ColdU), i.e. the occurrence of wheals or angioedema in response to cold exposure, is classified into typical and atypical forms. The diagnosis of typical ColdU relies on whealing in response to local cold stimulation testing (CST). It can also manifest with cold-induced anaphylaxis (ColdA). We aimed to determine risk factors for ColdA in typical ColdU. Methods. An international, cross-sectional study COLD-CE was carried out at 32 urticaria centers of reference and excellence (UCAREs). Detailed history was taken and CST with an ice cube and/or TempTest® performed. ColdA was defined as an acute cold-induced involvement of the skin and/or visible mucosal tissue and at least one of: cardiovascular manifestations, difficulty breathing, or gastrointestinal symptoms. Results. Of 551 ColdU patients, 75% (n=412) had a positive CST and ColdA occurred in 37% (n=151) of the latter. Cold-induced generalized wheals, angioedema, acral swelling, oropharyngeal/laryngeal symptoms, and itch of earlobes were identified as signs/symptoms of severe disease. ColdA was most commonly provoked by complete cold water immersion and ColdA caused by cold air was more common in countries with a warmer climate. Ten percent (n=40) of typical ColdU patients had a concomitant chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). They had a lower frequency of ColdA than those without CSU (4% vs 39%, p=0.003). We identified the following risk factors for cardiovascular manifestations: previous systemic reaction to a Hymenoptera sting, angioedema, oropharyngeal/laryngeal symptoms, and itchy earlobes. Conclusion. ColdA is common in typical ColdU. High-risk patients require education about their condition and how to use an adrenaline autoinjector.
Keywords: urticaria, risk factors, epinephrine - therapeutic use, self administration, intramuscular injections - methods, cold urticaria, systemic reactions, adrenaline autoinjector
Published in DiRROS: 31.08.2022; Views: 568; Downloads: 233
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2.
Management of suspected immediate perioperative allergic reactions : an international overview and consensus recommendations
Lene Heise Garvey, Pascale Dewachter, David L. Hepner, Paul Michel Mertes, Susanna Voltolini, Russel C. Clarke, Peter J. Cooke, Tomaz Garcez, Anne Berit Guttormsen, Didier G. Ebo, Philip M. Hopkins, Peter Kopač, 2019, review article

Abstract: Suspected perioperative allergic reactions are rare but can be life-threatening. The diagnosis is difficult to make in the perioperative setting, but prompt recognition and correct treatment is necessary to ensure a good outcome. A group of 26 international experts in perioperative allergy (anaesthesiologists, allergists, and immunologists) contributed to a modified Delphi consensus process, which covered areas such as differential diagnosis, management during and after anaphylaxis, allergy investigations, and plans for a subsequent anaesthetic. They were asked to rank the appropriateness of statements related to the immediate management of suspected perioperative allergic reactions. Statements were selected to represent areas where there is a lack of consensus in existing guidelines, such as dosing of epinephrine and fluids, the management of impending cardiac arrest, and reactions refractory to standard treatment. The results of the modified Delphi consensus process have been included in the recommendations on the management of suspected perioperative allergic reactions. This paper provides anaesthetists with an overview of relevant knowledge on the immediate and postoperative management of suspected perioperative allergic reactions based on current literature and expert opinion. In addition, it provides practical advice and recommendations in areas where consensus has been lacking in existing guidelines.
Keywords: allergy and immunology, drug hypersensitivity, anesthesia, drug-related side effects and adverse reactions, anaphylaxis, epinephrine, Delphi technique, perioperative period, allergic reactions, hypersensitivity reaction, adrenaline, perioperative anaphylaxis, allergy testing, guideline
Published in DiRROS: 09.10.2020; Views: 1416; Downloads: 430
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