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Query: "author" (Yi Liu) .

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Global homogenization of the structure and function in the soil microbiome of urban greenspaces
Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo, David J. Eldridge, Yu-Rong Liu, Blessing Sokoya, Jun-Tao Wang, Hang-Wei Hu, Ji-Zheng He, Felipe Bastida, José L. Moreno, Adebola R. Bamigboye, Tine Grebenc, Tina Unuk, 2021, original scientific article

Abstract: The structure and function of the soil microbiome of urban greenspaces remain largely undetermined. We conducted a global field survey in urban greenspaces and neighboring natural ecosystems across 56 cities from six continents, and found that urban soils are important hotspots for soil bacterial, protist and functional gene diversity, but support highly homogenized microbial communities worldwide. Urban greenspaces had a greater proportion of fast-growing bacteria, algae, amoebae, and fungal pathogens, but a lower proportion of ectomycorrhizal fungi than natural ecosystems. These urban ecosystems also showed higher proportions of genes associated with human pathogens, greenhouse gas emissions, faster nutrient cycling, and more intense abiotic stress than natural environments. City affluence, management practices, and climate were fundamental drivers of urban soil communities. Our work paves the way toward a more comprehensive global-scale perspective on urban greenspaces, which is integral to managing the health of these ecosystems and the well-being of human populations.
Keywords: soil biodiversity, structural diversity, functional diversity, urban soils
Published in DiRROS: 15.07.2021; Views: 507; Downloads: 360
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Heritable risk for severe anaphylaxis associated with increased [alpha]-tryptase-encoding germline copy number at TPSAB1
Jonathan J. Lyons, Jack Chovanec, Michael P. O'Connell, Yihui Liu, Julij Šelb, Roberta Zanotti, Yun Bai, Jiwon Kim, Quang T. Le, Tom DiMaggio, Matija Rijavec, Peter Korošec, 2020, original scientific article

Abstract: Background: An elevated basal serum tryptase level is associated with severe systemic anaphylaxis, most notably caused by Hymenoptera envenomation. Although clonal mast cell disease is the culprit in some individuals, it does not fully explain this clinical association. Objective: Our aim was to determine the prevalence and associated impact of tryptase genotypes on anaphylaxis in humans. Methods: Cohorts with systemic mastocytosis (SM) and venom as well as idiopathic anaphylaxis from referral centers in Italy, Slovenia, and the United States, underwent tryptase genotyping by droplet digital PCR. Associated anaphylaxis severity (Mueller scale) was subsequently examined. Healthy volunteers and controls with nonatopic disease were recruited and tryptase was genotyped by droplet digital PCR and in silico analysis of genome sequence, respectively. The effects of pooled and recombinant human tryptases, protease activated receptor 2 agonist and antagonist peptides, and a tryptase-neutralizing mAb on human umbilical vein endothelial cell permeability were assayed using a Transwell system. Results: Hereditary [alpha]-tryptasemia (H[alpha]T)--a genetic trait caused by increased [alpha]-tryptase-encoding Tryptase-[alpha]/[beta]1 (TPSAB1) copy number resulting in elevated BST level--was common in healthy individuals (5.6% [n = 7 of 125]) and controls with nonatopic disease (5.3% [n = 21 of 398]). H[alpha]T was associated with grade IV venom anaphylaxis (relative risk = 2.0; P < .05) and more prevalent in both idiopathic anaphylaxis (n = 8 of 47; [17%; P = .006]) and SM (n = 10 of 82 [12.2%; P = .03]) relative to the controls. Among patients with SM, concomitant H[alpha]T was associated with increased risk for systemic anaphylaxis (relative risk = 9.5; P = .007). In vitro, protease-activated receptor-2-dependent vascular permeability was induced by pooled mature tryptases but not [alpha]- or [beta]-tryptase homotetramers. Conclusions: Risk for severe anaphylaxis in humans is associated with inherited differences in [alpha]-tryptase-encoding copies at TPSAB1.
Keywords: mastocytosis, venoms, hypersensitivity, anaphylaxis - diagnosis, mast cells, idiopathic anaphylaxis, mast cell activation, hereditary alpha-tryptasemia
Published in DiRROS: 11.09.2020; Views: 1189; Downloads: 241
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