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Query: "author" (Anna Thit Johnsen) .

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1.
Coping strategies of patients with advanced lung or colorectal cancer in six European countries : insights from the ACTION study
Lea J. Jabbarian, Ida Joanna Korfage, Branka Červ, Johannes JM van Delden, Luc Deliens, Guido Miccinesi, Sheila Payne, Anna Thit Johnsen, Mariette Verkissen, Andrew Wilcock, Agnes van der Heide, Judith Anna Catharina Rietjens, 2020

Abstract: Objective: Even when medical treatments are limited, supporting patients' coping strategies could improve their quality of life. Greater understanding of patients' coping strategies, and influencing factors, can aid developing such support. We examined the prevalence of coping strategies and associated variables. Methods: We used sociodemographic and baseline data from the ACTION trial, including measures of Denial, Acceptance and Problem-focused coping (COPE; Brief COPE inventory), of patients with advanced cancer from six European countries. Clinicians provided clinical information. Linear mixed models with clustering at hospital level were used. Results: Data from 675 patients with stage III/ IV lung (342, 51%) or stage IV colorectal (333, 49%) cancer were used; mean age 66 (10 SD) years. Overall, patients scored low on Denial and high on Acceptance and Problem-focused coping. Older age was associated with higher scores on Denial than younger age ([beta] = 0.05; CI[0.023; 0.074]), and patients from Italy ([beta] = 1.57 CI[0.760; 2.388]) and Denmark ([beta] = 1.82 CI[0.881; 2.750]) scored higher on Denial than patients in other countries. Conclusions: Patients with advanced cancer predominantly used Acceptance and Problem-focused coping, and Denial to a lesser extent. Since the studied coping strategies of patients with advanced cancer vary between subpopulations, we recommend taking these factors into account when developing tailored interventions to support patients' coping strategies.
Keywords: ACTION study, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, coping strategies
DiRROS - Published: 29.07.2020; Views: 1048; Downloads: 602
.pdf Fulltext (319,54 KB)

2.
Content analysis of Advance Directives completed by patients with advanced cancer as part of an Advance Care Planning intervention : insights gained from the ACTION trial
Marieke Zwakman, Johannes JM van Delden, Glenys Caswell, Luc Deliens, F. Ingravallo, Lea J. Jabbarian, Anna Thit Johnsen, Ida Joanna Korfage, Alenka Mimič, C. Møller Arnfeldt, Urška Lunder, Branka Červ, Anja Simonič, Hana Kodba Čeh, Polona Ozbič, 2019

Abstract: Purpose. Writing an Advance Directive (AD) is often seen as a part of Advance Care Planning (ACP). ADs may include specific preferences regarding future care and treatment and information that provides a context for healthcare professionals and relatives in case they have to make decisions for the patient. The aim of this study was to get insight into the content of ADs as completed by patients with advanced cancer who participated in ACP conversations. Methods. A mixed methods study involving content analysis and descriptive statistics was used to describe the content of completed My Preferences forms, an AD used in the intervention arm of the ACTION trial, testing the effectiveness of the ACTION Respecting Choices ACP intervention. Results. In total, 33% of 442 patients who received the ACTION RC ACP intervention completed a My Preferences form. Document completion varied per country: 10.4% (United Kingdom), 20.6% (Denmark), 29.2% (Belgium), 41.7% (the Netherlands), 61.3% (Italy) and 63.9% (Slovenia). Content analysis showed that 'maintaining normal life' and 'experiencing meaningful relationships' were important for patients to live well. Fears and worries mainly concerned disease progression, pain or becoming dependent. Patients hoped for prolongation of life and to be looked after by healthcare professionals. Most patients preferred to be resuscitated and 44% of the patients expressed maximizing comfort as their goal of future care. Most patients preferred 'home' as final place of care. Conclusions. My Preferences forms provide some insights into patients' perspectives and preferences. However, understanding the reasoning behind preferences requires conversations with patients.
Keywords: advance care planning, psycho-oncology, medical oncology, ACTION study, cancer, end of life, dying persons
DiRROS - Published: 15.02.2021; Views: 670; Downloads: 375
.pdf Fulltext (351,21 KB)

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