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Iskalni niz: "ključne besede" (sustainable forestry) .

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1.
Social context as a pillar of sustainable forest management - a Slovenian case
Nevenka Bogataj, 2009

Povzetek: Social context as more or less neglected field of sustainable development is crucial for the implementation of forest management measures. We can consider it as a basis to cope with (changing) structure characteristics. Realisation of public services, which we face when coping with economic crisis, might take this into consideration. The Forest Service network serves as a scanner of needs in their social context. It is also a respondent to local specifics in the form of forest management measures. Evidence of research on the social research in Slovenian forestry is weak, although not non-existent. We tested asystem approach, a structuring method of general public. Segmentation, a method presented, is generally known in marketing and has not been used in Slovenian forestry up to now. The two-step clustering analysis of quantitative data gathered with an inquiry of study circles (form of community learning) was used and is described herewith. The results show three general value based segments of study circle participants. The role of Slovenian foresty is changing and is not independent of its dynamic and colourful social contexts, Recognition of the society structure and dynamics may contribute to the rationalisation of organisational models during the crisis period. Hoewer, grounded actualisation of recent organisational models is possible only by considering priorities of the society's segments. We conclude with suggestion for more R&D engagement in the social pillar of multifunctional forest management, in particular as the Slovenian social context is defined by dominance of private property and forest owners' ageing, which are far from being analysed and responded to.
Ključne besede: forestry, sustainable development, structure of society, segmentation, information flow, knowledge flow
DiRROS - Objavljeno: 12.07.2017; Ogledov: 2836; Prenosov: 1016
.pdf Celotno besedilo (309,11 KB)

2.
Global guidelines for the sustainable use of non-native trees to prevent tree invasions and mitigate their negative impacts
Giuseppe Brundu, Aníbal Pauchard, Petr Pyšek, Jan Pergl, Anja M. Bindewald, Antonio Brunori, Susan Canavan, Thomas Campagnaro, Laura Celesti-Grapow, Michele de Sá Dechoum, Marjana Westergren, 2020

Povzetek: Sustainably managed non-native trees deliver economic and societal benefits with limited risk of spread to adjoining areas. However, some plantations have launched invasions that cause substantial damage to biodiversity and ecosystem services, while others pose substantial threats of causing such impacts. The challenge is to maximise the benefits of non-native trees, while minimising negative impacts and preserving future benefits and options. A workshop was held in 2019 to develop global guidelines for the sustainable use of non-native trees, using the Council of Europe % Bern Convention Code of Conduct on Invasive Alien Trees as a starting point. The global guidelines consist of eight recommendations: 1) Use native trees, or non-invasive non-native trees, in preference to invasive non-native trees; 2) Be aware of and comply with international, national, and regional regulations concerning non-native trees; 3) Be aware of the risk of invasion and consider global change trends; 4) Design and adopt tailored practices for plantation site selection and silvicultural management; 5) Promote and implement early detection and rapid response programmes; 6) Design and adopt tailored practices for invasive non-native tree control, habitat restoration, and for dealing with highly modified ecosystems; 7) Engage with stakeholders on the risks posed by invasive non-native trees, the impacts caused, and the options for management; and 8) Develop and support global networks, collaborative research, and information sharing on native and non-native trees. The global guidelines are a first step towards building global consensus on the precautions that should be taken when introducing and planting non-native trees. They are voluntary and are intended to complement statutory requirements under international and national legislation. The application of the global guidelines and the achievement of their goals will help to conserve forest biodiversity, ensure sustainable forestry, and contribute to the achievement of several Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations linked with forest biodiversity.
Ključne besede: biological invasions, code of conduct, environmental policy and legislation, invasion science, stakeholder engagement, stakeholder participation, sustainable forestry
DiRROS - Objavljeno: 26.01.2021; Ogledov: 671; Prenosov: 388
.pdf Celotno besedilo (1,34 MB)

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