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Iskalni niz: "avtor" (Erin Bullas-Appleton) .

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1.
Challenges and solutions in early detection, rapid response and communication about potential invasive alien species in forests
Jana Kus Veenvliet, Simon Zidar, David Williams, Laura Verbrugge, Elena Tricarico, Jon Sweeney, Craig Shuttleworth, Nikki Robinson, Aleksander Marinšek, Márton Korda, Natalia Kirichenko, Eugenio Gervasini, Massimo Faccoli, Ágnes Csíszár, György Csóka, Erin Bullas-Appleton, Richard O'Hanlon, Maarten De Groot, 2020

Povzetek: Invasive alien species (IAS) are an important threat to forests. One of the best ways to manage potential IAS is through early detection and rapid response (EDRR) strategies. However, when dealing with IAS in forests, EU regulations are divided between phytosanitary regulations and IAS regulations. A version of EDRR for the former has been in place in the EU for more than 15 years while the latter is still in the process of being implemented. During 2019, a workshop was held to gather international experts on different plant health pests and IAS. The purpose of this workshop was to identify the opportunities and difficulties in applying the EDRR system in the EU phytosanitary and IAS legislation to four species for providing suggestions to improve the EDRR system. The model species are well known and come from different trophic levels. These species were the American pokeweed (Phytolacca americana), the grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis); and the plant health pests Geosmithia morbida and Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis). We identified the similarities in the challenges of early detection, rapid response and communication of these species. For all species, difficulties in species identification, knowledge gaps on the pathways of spread, a lack of resources and uncertainty over which national government service was the competent authority were identified as the main challenges. Other challenges like public perception for the grey squirrel or methodological problems were species-specific. Regarding the rapid response: public perception, determination of the eradication area, sufficient scientific capacity and the lack of resources were common challenges for all species. Therefore, collaboration between institutes dealing with plant health pests and IAS can lead to better control of both groups of unwanted %organisms in forests.
Ključne besede: early warning system, plant health legislation, EU IAS legislation, alien species, Geosmithia morbida, Emerald ash borer, American pokeweed, Grey squirrel, rapid response system
DiRROS - Objavljeno: 11.12.2020; Ogledov: 776; Prenosov: 271
URL Celotno besedilo (0,00 KB)

2.
Ethical dilemmas when using citizen science for early detection of invasive tree pests and diseases
Erin Bullas-Appleton, Mariella Marzano, Michael J.O. Pocock, Alison Dyke, Maarten De Groot, Craig Shuttleworth, Rehema White, 2020

Povzetek: The early detection of tree health pests and disease is an important component of biosecurity to protect the aesthetic, recreational and economic importance of trees, woodlands and forestry. Citizen science is valuable in supporting the early detection of tree pests and diseases. Different stakeholders (government, business, society and individual) will vary in their opinion of the balance between costs and benefits of early detection and consequent management, partly because many costs are local whereas benefits are felt at larger scales. This can create clashes in motivations of those involved in citizen science, thus leading to ethical dilemmas about what is good and responsible conduct for the use of citizen science. We draw on our experience of tree health citizen science to exemplify five dilemmas. These dilemmas arise because: the consequences of detection may locally be severe (e.g. the destruction of trees); knowledge of these impacts could lead to refusal to make citizen science reports; citizen science reports can be made freely, but can be costly to respond to; participants may expect solutions even if these are not possible; and early detection is (by definition) a rare event. Effective engagement and dialogue across stakeholders, including public stakeholders, is important to properly address these issues. This is vital to ensure the public%s long-term support for and trust in the use of citizen science for the early detection of tree pests and diseases.
Ključne besede: alien species, volunteer, eradication, participatory research
DiRROS - Objavljeno: 14.12.2020; Ogledov: 600; Prenosov: 235
URL Celotno besedilo (0,00 KB)

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