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Query: "keywords" (wood structure) .

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1.
Relationships between wood-anatomical features and resistance drilling density in Norway spruce and European beech
Domen Arnič, Luka Krajnc, Jožica Gričar, Peter Prislan, 2022, original scientific article

Abstract: Environmental conditions affect tree-ring width (TRW), wood structure, and, consequently, wood density, which is one of the main wood quality indicators. Although studies on inter- and intra-annual variability in tree-ring features or density exist, studies demonstrating a clear link between wood structure on a cellular level and its effect on wood density on a macroscopic level are rare. Norway spruce with its simple coniferous structure and European beech, a diffuse-porous angiosperm species were selected to analyze these relationships. Increment cores were collected from both species at four sites in Slovenia. In total, 24 European beech and 17 Norway spruce trees were sampled. In addition, resistance drilling measurements were performed just a few centimeters above the increment core sampling. TRW and quantitative wood anatomy measurements were performed on the collected cores. Resistance drilling density values, tree-ring (TRW, earlywood width–EWW, transition-TWW, and latewood width–LWW) and wood-anatomical features (vessel/tracheid area and diameter, cell density, relative conductive area, and cell wall thickness) were then averaged for the first 7 cm of measurements. We observed significant relationships between tree-ring and wood-anatomical features in both spruce and beech. In spruce, the highest correlation values were found between TRW and LWW. In beech, the highest correlations were observed between TRW and cell density. There were no significant relationships between wood-anatomical features and resistance drilling density in beech. However, in spruce, a significant negative correlation was found between resistance drilling density and tangential tracheid diameter, and a positive correlation between resistance drilling density and both TWW + LWW and LWW. Our findings suggest that resistance drilling measurements can be used to evaluate differences in density within and between species, but they should be improved in resolution to be able to detect changes in wood anatomy.
Keywords: wood structure, Fagus sylvatica, Picea abies, quantitative wood anatomy, xylem anatomy, wood density, increment borer
Published in DiRROS: 08.04.2022; Views: 120; Downloads: 140
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2.
The effect of bedrock and species mixture on wood density and radial wood increment in pubescent oak and black pine
Luka Krajnc, Polona Hafner, Jožica Gričar, 2020, original scientific article

Abstract: Wood density and radial wood increment were examined in trees of pubescent oak (Quercus pubescens Willd.) and black pine (Pinus nigra Arnold., subsp. nigra) in relation to stand mixture and underlying bedrock. Trees of both species from pure and mixed stands were sampled across two types of bedrock, limestone and flysch. Trees from each species were similar in age. Wood density was estimated in standing trees using resistance drilling and increment cores were taken from a smaller subsample of trees of both species. Tree-ring, earlywood and latewood widths were measured and compared to radial profiles of wood density. The influence of stand mixture, diameter at breast height and bedrock on wood density was examined using a Bayesian general linear model. Wood density was significantly higher in pubescent oak than in black pine. Stand mixture was found to affect wood density positively, although the magnitude of the effect was relatively small when compared to other influencing factors also included in the current study. The effect of diameter on wood density was positive on both bedrocks in pubescent oak and negative or neutral in black pine. The size of the effect varied by bedrock and species. On flysch bedrock, the influence of diameter on wood density was stronger than it was on limestone. These indirect bedrock effects on wood density are probably a result of different soil fertility rather than the bedrock itself. There was a notable difference in radial wood increment in both species across the two bedrocks, whereas the differences in densities were smaller. Higher wood densities found on flysch in the subsample of pubescent oaks are likely an effect of higher proportions of latewood, while the opposite trend was observed in black pine. Higher wood density was found on limestone in black pine despite higher latewood percentages on flysch. In the context of forest management, the species composition of the naturally occurring mixtures in the sub-Mediterranean region should be adjusted slightly to favor pubescent oak, since it is a climax species and will bind more carbon for longer than black pine due to higher wood densities. Future forest management should also promote the overall development of pubescent oak trees in sub-Mediterranean stands. The results are especially important in the European context, because the share of sub-Mediterranean stands is expected to rise with global warming.
Keywords: Karst, wood structure, resistograph, resistance drilling, Quercus pubescens, Pinus nigra, limestone, flysch
Published in DiRROS: 14.01.2021; Views: 648; Downloads: 37
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