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Query: "keywords" (vegetation indices) .

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Empirical approach for modelling tree phenology in mixed forests using remote sensing
Koffi Dodji Noumonvi, Gal Oblišar, Ana Žust, Urša Vilhar, 2021

Abstract: : Phenological events are good indicators of the effects of climate change, since phenological phases are sensitive to changes in environmental conditions. Although several national phenological networks monitor the phenology of different plant species, direct observations can only be conducted on individual trees, which cannot be easily extended over large and continuous areas. Remote sensing has often been applied to model phenology for large areas, focusing mostly on pure forests in which it is relatively easier to match vegetation indices with ground observations. In mixed forests, phenology modelling from remote sensing is often limited to land surface phenology, which consists of an overall phenology of all tree species present in a pixel. The potential of remote sensing for modelling the phenology of individual tree species in mixed forests remains underexplored. In this study, we applied the seasonal midpoint (SM) method with MODIS GPP to model the start of season (SOS) and the end of season (EOS) of six different tree species in Slovenian mixed forests. First, substitute locations were identified for each combination of observation station and plant species based on similar environmental conditions (aspect, slope, and altitude) and tree species of interest, and used to retrieve the remote sensing information used in the SM method after fitting the best of a Gaussian and two double logistic functions to each year of GPP time series. Then, the best thresholds were identified for SOS and EOS, and the results were validated using cross-validation. The results show clearly that the usual threshold of 0.5 is not best in most cases, especially for estimating the EOS. Despite the difficulty in modelling the phenology of different tree species in a mixed forest using remote sensing, it was possible to estimate SOS and EOS with moderate errors as low as <8 days (Fagus sylvatica and Tilia sp.) and <10 days (Fagus sylvatica and Populus tremula), respectively.
Keywords: phenology modelling, start of season, end of season, remote sensing, MODIS GPP, vegetation indices, threshold methods
DiRROS - Published: 23.08.2021; Views: 363; Downloads: 233
.pdf Fulltext (2,63 MB)

3.
Empirical vs. light-use efficiency modelling for estimating carbon fluxes in a mid-succession ecosystem developed on abandoned karst grassland
Koffi Dodji Noumonvi, Mitja Ferlan, 2020

Abstract: Karst systems represent an important carbon sink worldwide. However, several phenomena such as the CO2 degassing and the exchange of cave air return a considerable amount of CO2 to the atmosphere. It is therefore of paramount importance to understand the contribution of the ecosystem to the carbon budget of karst areas. In this study conducted in a mid-succession ecosystem developed on abandoned karst grassland, two types of model were assessed, estimating the gross primary production (GPP) or the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) based on seven years of eddy covariance data (2013%2019): (1) a quadratic vegetation index-based empirical model with five alternative vegetation indices as proxies of GPP and NEE, and (2) the vegetation photosynthesis model (VPM) which is a light use efficiency model to estimate only GPP. The Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) was the best proxy for NEE whereas SAVI performed very similarly to EVI in the case of GPP in the empirical model setting. The empirical model performed better than the VPM model which tended to underestimate GPP. Therefore, for this ecosystem, we suggest the use of the empirical model provided that the quadratic relationship observed persists. However, the VPM model would be a good alternative under a changing climate, as it is rooted in the understanding of the photosynthesis process, if the scalars it involves could be improved to better estimate GPP.
Keywords: eddy covariance, carbon flux, GPP, NEE, vegetation indices, remote sensing, satellite data, GPP map
DiRROS - Published: 03.01.2022; Views: 154; Downloads: 112
.pdf Fulltext (3,07 MB)

4.
Carbon flux and environmental parameters data from an eddy covariance tower in a mid-succession ecosystem developed on abandoned karst grassland in Slovenia (2012-2019)
Koffi Dodji Noumonvi, Klemen Eler, Dominik Vodnik, Primož Simončič, Mitja Ferlan, 2021

Abstract: This data set was used to estimate carbon fluxes by comparing eddy covariance tower (Long = 13.916701, Lat = 45.543491) measurements with vegetation indices based estimates.
Keywords: eddy covariance, GPP, NEE, empirical model, LUE model, vegetation photosynthesis model, vegetation indices
DiRROS - Published: 21.02.2022; Views: 124; Downloads: 92
Fulltext (29,63 KB)
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