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1.
Fractional heat shock protein 27 urine excretion as a short-term predictor in acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Denise Traxler, Matthias Zimmermann, Elisabeth Simader, Elisa Einwallner, Dragan Copic, Alexandra Graf, Thomas Mueller, Cecilia Veraar, Mitja Lainščak, Robert Marčun, Mitja Košnik, Matjaž Fležar, Aleš Rozman, Peter Korošec, 2020

Abstract: Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and is characterized by episodes of acute exacerbations. Finding a systemic biomarker that reliably predicts outcome after an acute exacerbation remains a major challenge. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) has been previously studied in COPD, however, urine excretion trajectory and prognostic value after an exacerbation is unknown. Methods: In this retrospective post hoc analysis of a prospective study that included 253 COPD patients who were hospitalized for acute exacerbation, 207 patients were analyzed. Urine and serum were sampled at admission, discharge, and 180 days after discharge; urine excretion trajectory was analyzed and correlated with clinicopathological and survival data. Results: HSP27 urine excretion increased after an exacerbation episode [1.8% admission, 1.8% discharge, 2.3% 180 days after discharge (P=0.091)]. In severely ill patients (GOLD IV) this course was even more distinct [1.6% admission, 2.1% discharge, 2.8% 180 days after discharge (P=0.007)]. Furthermore, fractional HSP27 urine excretion at discharge was increased in GOLD IV patients (P=0.031). In Kaplan-Meier and univariable Cox proportional hazard models patients with HSP27 urine excretion below 0.845% showed significantly worse survival at 30, 90 and 180 days after discharge. In a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model including established COPD outcome parameters fractional HSP27 urine excretion remained a significant predictor of survival at 30 and 90 days after discharge. Comparing this model to our already published model that includes HSP27 serum concentration we could show that fractional HSP27 urine excretion performs better in short-term survival. Conclusions: Our findings provide novel information about fractional HSP27 urine excretion trajectory in acute exacerbation of COPD. Fractional HSP27 urine excretion may be significantly reduced during an episode of acute exacerbation in COPD patients and may be used as a predictor of short-term all-cause mortality.
Keywords: biomarkers, heat-shock proteins, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, urine, heat shock protein 27
DiRROS - Published: 25.01.2021; Views: 168; Downloads: 43

2.
The clinical relevance of oliguria in the critically ill patient : analysis of a large observational database
Jean Louis Vincent, Andrew Ferguson, Peter Pickkers, Stephan M. Jakob, Ulrich Jaschinski, Ghaleb A. Almekhlafi, Marc Leone, Majid Mokhtari, Luis E. Fontes, Philippe R. Bauer, Yasser Sakr, 2020

Abstract: Background: Urine output is widely used as one of the criteria for the diagnosis and staging of acute renal failure, but few studies have specifically assessed the role of oliguria as a marker of acute renal failure or outcomes in general intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Using a large multinational database, we therefore evaluated the occurrence of oliguria (defined as a urine output < 0.5 ml/kg/h) in acutely ill patients and its association with the need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) and outcome. Methods: International observational study. All adult (> 16 years) patients in the ICON audit who had a urine output measurement on the day of admission were included. To investigate the association between oliguria and mortality, we used a multilevel analysis. Results: Of the 8292 patients included, 2050 (24.7%) were oliguric during the first 24 h of admission. Patients with oliguria on admission who had at least one additional 24-h urine output recorded during their ICU stay (n = 1349) were divided into three groups: transient-oliguria resolved within 48 h after the admission day (n = 390 [28.9%]), prolonged-oliguria resolved > 48 h after the admission day (n = 141 [10.5%]), and permanent-oliguria persisting for the whole ICU stay or again present at the end of the ICU stay (n = 818 [60.6%]). ICU and hospital mortality rates were higher in patients with oliguria than in those without, except for patients with transient oliguria who had significantly lower mortality rates than non-oliguric patients. In multilevel analysis, the need for RRT was associated with a significantly higher risk of death (OR = 1.51 [95% CI 1.19%1.91], p = 0.001), but the presence of oliguria on admission was not (OR = 1.14 [95% CI 0.97%1.34], p = 0.103). Conclusions: Oliguria is common in ICU patients and may have a relatively benign nature if only transient. The duration of oliguria and need for RRT are associated with worse outcome.
Keywords: critical care, critical illness, urine, oliguria, kidney, renal insufficiency, kidney diseases, acute kidney failure, mortality, urine output, renal replacement therapy
DiRROS - Published: 18.11.2020; Views: 222; Downloads: 184
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