Digital repository of Slovenian research organisations

Search the repository
A+ | A- | Help | SLO | ENG

Query: search in
search in
search in
search in
Research data

Options:
  Reset

Query: "keywords" (physical functions) .

1 - 2 / 2
First pagePrevious page1Next pageLast page
1.
Motor imagery and action observation as appropriate strategies for home-based rehabilitation : ǂa ǂmini-review focusing on improving physical function in orthopedic patients
Armin Paravlić, 2022

Abstract: Dynamic stability of the knee and weakness of the extensor muscles are considered to be the most important functional limitations after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, probably due to changes at the central (cortical and corticospinal) level of motor control rather than at the peripheral level. Despite general technological advances, fewer contraindicative surgical procedures, and extensive postoperative rehabilitation, up to 65% of patients fail to return to their preinjury level of sports, and only half were able to return to competitive sport. Later, it becomes clear that current rehabilitation after knee surgery is not sufficient to address the functional limitations after ACL reconstruction even years after surgery. Therefore, new therapeutic tools targeting the central neural system, i.e., the higher centers of motor control, should be investigated and integrated into current rehabilitation practice. To improve motor performance when overt movement cannot be fully performed (e.g., due to pain, impaired motor control, and/or joint immobilization), several techniques have been developed to increase physical and mental activation without the need to perform overt movements. Among the most popular cognitive techniques used to increase physical performance are motor imagery and action observation practices. This review, which examines the available evidence, presents the underlying mechanisms of the efficacy of cognitive interventions and provides guidelines for their use at home.
Keywords: motor imagery, action observation, virtual reality, rehabilitation, physical functions, mental simulation
DiRROS - Published: 03.03.2022; Views: 147; Downloads: 102
.pdf Fulltext (480,89 KB)

2.
Effect of a warm-up protocol with and without facemask-use against COVID-19 on cognitive function : ǂa ǂpilot, randomized counterbalanced, cross-sectional study
Maamer Slimani, Bianca Miarka, Hela Znazen, Wassim Moalla, Amri Hammami, Armin Paravlić, Nicola Luigi Bragazzi, 2021

Abstract: The present study aimed to verify the effect of a warm-up protocol with and without facemask-use on cognitive function. The sample was composed of 17 healthy, non-smoking physical education students (age = 17.6 years, height = 1.71 m, and body mass = 69.7 kg). They were randomized to perform 15 min of warm-up exercises, while wearing a cloth facemask (EXP) or no mask (CON) on two separate occasions, with at least 48-h separating conditions. Rate of perceived exertion (RPE) and d2 Attention assessment were used to verify cognitive function, using a repeated measures general linear model. The warm-up improved cognitive abilities and the results demonstrated significant differences between the EXP vs. CON groups in post-concentration performance (186.06 % 15.47 EXP-score vs. 178.12 % 13.66 CON-score), post the total number of errors (23.47 % 14.50 EXP-frequency < 29.06 % 13.74 CON-frequency), and in the post RPE (6.0 % 1.37 EXP-index > 4.7 % 0.85 CON-index). Wearing a cloth facemask caused positive effects on cognitive function. This data suggests that wearing a cloth facemask during warm-up may stimulate/improve the cognitive function.
Keywords: pandemic, coronavirus, COVID-19, physical activities, exercises, facemasks, warm-up protocol, cognitive functions, neuropsychological tests
DiRROS - Published: 11.06.2021; Views: 516; Downloads: 320
.pdf Fulltext (320,39 KB)

Search done in 0 sec.
Back to top