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1.
Epidemiološke značilnosti raka prebavil v Sloveniji
Vera Pompe-Kirn, 1997

Keywords: Cancer registry, Cancer incidence
DiRROS - Published: 17.09.2019; Views: 1352; Downloads: 385
.pdf Fulltext (469,52 KB)

2.
Rak pri otrocih
Gabrijela Petrič-Grabnar, 1995

Keywords: Cancer incidence
DiRROS - Published: 04.02.2020; Views: 1033; Downloads: 364
.pdf Fulltext (584,57 KB)

3.
Expenditures on oncology drugs and cancer mortality-to-incidence ratio in Central and Eastern Europe
Eduard Vrdoljak, Gyorgy Bodoky, Jacek Jassem, Razvan A. Popescu, Robert Pirker, Tanja Čufer, Semir Beslija, Alexsandru Eniu, Vladimir Todorović, Katerina Kopečková, 2019

Abstract: Background. There is a steady decline in cancer mortality in Western Europe (WE), but this trend is not so obvious in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). One of the largest discrepancies between WE and CEE is the level of investment in cancer care. The objective of our analysis was to examine the correlation between mortality-to-incidence (M/I) ratio and expenditures on oncology drugs in CEE and WE. Materials and Methods. This cross-sectional analysis was done on publicly available data. Data on expenditures for oncology drugs were obtained from QuintilesIMS, and data on M/I ratio from Globocan. The main outcome was mortality-to-incidence ratio, and the primary analysis was performed by Spearman's rank correlation. Results. There is a large discrepancy in expenditure on oncology drugs per cancer case between WE and CEE, and within CEE. Average expenditure on oncology drugs per capita as well as per new cancer case was 2.5 times higher in WE than in CEE. Availability of oncology drugs was highest in Germany (100%), relatively similar in WE (average of 91%), but in CEE it ranged from 37% to 86%, with an average of 70%. Annual expenditures on all oncology drugs per new cancer case was significantly negatively correlated with the M/I ratio (Spearman's p = -0.90, p < .001). Conclusion. There is a financial threshold for oncology drugs per cancer case needed to increase survival. Based on significantly lower expenditures for oncology drugs in CEE in comparison with WE, more investment for drugs as well as better, more organized,value-oriented consumption is needed. Implications for Practice. Cancer is not treated equally successfully in Western Europe (WE) and in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). This study showed that success in treatment of cancer is associated with the amount of money invested in oncology drugs. CEE countries spend on average 2.5 times less than WE countries for oncology drugs per new cancer case. These findings should be used by healthcare providers and oncologists struggling for more resources and better, more organized, evidence-based allocation of these resources as well as better oncology outcomes.
Keywords: neoplasms -- mortality -- epidemiology, incidence, pharmaceutical preparations -- economics, cancer, oncology, Central Europe, Eastern Europe, drug expenditures
DiRROS - Published: 26.10.2020; Views: 742; Downloads: 116

4.
Next-generation sequencing of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates in low-incidence countries
Nataša Toplak, Eva Sodja, Minka Kovač, Simon Koren, Marija Žolnir-Dovč, Biljana Ilievska Poposka, Sara Truden, 2019

Abstract: Drug resistant tuberculosis (TB), especially multidrug (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) TB, is still a serious problem in global TB control. Slovenia and North Macedonia are low-incidence countries with TB incidence rates of 5.4 and 10.4 in 2017, respectively. In both countries, the percentage of drug resistant TB is very low with sporadic cases of MDR-TB. However, global burden of drug-resistant TB continues to increase imposing huge impact on public health systems and strongly stimulating the detection of gene variants related with drug resistance in TB. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) can provide comprehensive analysis of gene variants linked to drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the feasibility of a full-length gene analysis for the drug resistance related genes (inhA, katG, rpoB, embB) using Ion Torrent technology and to compare the NGS results with those obtained from conventional phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST) in TB isolates. Between 1996 and 2017, we retrospectively selected 56 TB strains from our National mycobacterial culture collection. Of those, 33 TB isolates from Slovenian patients were isolated from various clinical samples and subjected to phenotypic DST testing in Laboratory for Mycobacteria (University Clinic Golnik, Slovenia). The remaining 23 TB isolates were isolated from Macedonian patients and sent to our laboratory for assistance in phenotypic DST testing. TB strains included were either mono-, poly- or multidrug resistant. For control purposes, we also randomly selected five TB strains susceptible to first-line anti-TB drugs. High concordance between genetic (Ion Torrent technology) and standard phenotypic DST testing for isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol was observed, with percent of agreement of 77%, 93.4% and 93.3%, sensitivities of 68.2%, 100% and 100%, and specificities of 100%, 80% and 88.2%, respectively. In conclusion, the genotypic DST using Ion Torrent semiconductor NGS successfully predicted drug resistance with significant shortening of time needed to obtain the resistance profiles from several weeks to just a few days.
Keywords: drug resistant tuberculosis, next-generation sequencing, low-incidence countries, phenotypic drug susceptibility testing
DiRROS - Published: 24.07.2020; Views: 1197; Downloads: 581
.pdf Fulltext (144,02 KB)

5.
Completeness of tuberculosis (TB) notification : inventory studies and capture-recapture analyses, six European Union countries, 2014 to 2016
Petra Svetina, Carlos Carvalho, Aleksandar Šimunović, Henrieke Schimmel, Peter H Andersen, Masja Straetemans, Mirjam I Bakker, Sandra Alba, Christina Mergenthaler, Ente Rood, 2020

Abstract: Background. Progress towards the World Health Organization's End TB Strategy is monitored by assessing tuberculosis (TB) incidence, often derived from TB notification, assuming complete case detection and reporting. This assumption is unlikely to hold in many settings, including European Union (EU) countries. Aim. We aimed to assess observed and estimated completeness of TB notification through inventory studies and capture-recapture (CRC) methodology in six EU countries: Croatia, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, Portugal, Slovenia. Methods. We performed record linkage, case ascertainment and CRC analyses of data collected retrospectively from at least three national TB-related registers in each country between 2014 and 2016. Results. Observed completeness of TB notification by inventory studies was 73.9% in Croatia, 98.7% in Denmark, 83.6% in Finland, 81.6% in the Netherlands, 85.8% in Portugal and 100% in Slovenia. Subsequent CRC analysis estimated completeness of TB notification to be 98.4% in Denmark, 76.5% in Finland and 77.0% in Portugal. In Croatia, CRC analyses produced implausible results while in the Netherlands and Slovenia, it was methodologically considered not meaningful. Conclusion. Inventory studies and CRC methodology suggest a TB notification completeness between 73.9% and 100% in the six EU countries. Mandatory reporting by clinicians and laboratories, and cross-checking of registers, strongly contributes to accurate notification rates, but hospital episode registers likely contain a considerable proportion of false-positive TB records and are thus less useful. Further strengthening routine surveillance to count TB cases, i.e. incidence, accurately by employing record-linkage of high-quality TB registers should make CRC studies obsolete in EU countries.
Keywords: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis, incidence, public health surveillance, registries, reporting, notification, data collection, data analysis
DiRROS - Published: 27.07.2020; Views: 977; Downloads: 533
.pdf Fulltext (214,77 KB)

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