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Query: "keywords" (genetic diversity) .

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1.
Genetic diversity of core vs. peripheral Norway spruce native populations at a local scale in Slovenia
Hojka Kraigher, Gregor Božič, Marjana Westergren

Abstract: We investigated the levels of genetic diversity and population differentiation among core and peripheral populations of Norway spruce along an altitudinal gradient (from inversions to upper tree line) using isoenzymes (ISO) and nuclear simple-sequence repeats (SSR) markers on overlapping set of populations. Twenty-seven to seventy trees from 11 and 7 populations were genotyped with isoenzymes and SSRs, respectively. The results partially conform to the expectations of the central-peripheral hypothesis (CPH) and are consistent for both marker sets. Genetic differentiation among peripheral populations was low but significantly different from zero (FST-ISO = 0.013, FST-SSR = 0.009) and higher than that among core populations (FST-ISO = 0.007, FST-SSR = 0.005), conforming to central peripheral hypothesis. Contrastingly, levels of genetic diversity assessed by both richness and equitability measures did not significantly differ between peripheral and core populations (AR-ISO = 2.20 vs. 2.14, AR-SSR = 17.16 vs. 17.68, HE-ISO = 0.183 vs. 0.185, and HE-SSR = 0.935 vs. 0.935 for peripheral and core populations, respectively).
Keywords: central peripheral hypothesis, Picea abies (L.) Karst., genetic diversity, genetic differentiation, upper tree line, inversion
DiRROS - Published: 07.05.2018; Views: 7341; Downloads: 1316
.pdf Fulltext (561,16 KB)

2.
The interplay between forest management practices, genetic monitoring, and other long-term monitoring systems
Darius Kavaliauskas, Barbara Fussi, Marjana Westergren, Filipos Aravanopoulos, Domen Finžgar, Roland Baier, Paraskevi Alizoti, Gregor Božič, Evangelia V. Avramidou, Monika Konnert, Hojka Kraigher, 2018

Abstract: The conservation and sustainable use of forests and forest genetic resources (FGR) is a challenging task for scientists and foresters. Forest management practices can affect diversity on various levels: genetic, species, and ecosystem. Understanding past natural disturbance dynamics and their level of dependence on human disturbances and management practices is essential for the conservation and management of FGR, especially in the light of climate change. In this review, forest management practices and their impact on genetic composition are reviewed, synthesized, and interpreted in the light of existing national and international forest monitoring schemes and concepts from various European projects. There is a clear need and mandate for forest genetic monitoring (FGM), while the requirements thereof lack complementarity with existing forest monitoring. Due to certain obstacles (e.g., the lack of unified FGM implementation procedures across the countries, high implementation costs, large number of indicators and verifiers for FGM proposed in the past), merging FGM with existing forest monitoring is complicated. Nevertheless, FGM is of paramount importance for forestry and the natural environment in the future, regardless of the presence or existence of other monitoring systems, as it provides information no other monitoring system can yield. FGM can provide information related to adaptive and neutral genetic diversity changes over time, on a species and/or on a population basis and can serve as an early warning system for the detection of potentially harmful changes of forest adaptability. In addition, FGM offers knowledge on the adaptive potential of forests under the changing environment, which is important for the long-term conservation of FGR
Keywords: forest monitoring, forest genetic monitoring, forest genetic diversity, silviculture
DiRROS - Published: 20.02.2020; Views: 1443; Downloads: 869
.pdf Fulltext (766,78 KB)

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Genomics and adaptation in forest ecosystems
Charalambos Neophytou, Katrin Heer, Pascal Miles, Martina Peter, Tanja Pyhäjärvi, Marjana Westergren, Christian Rellstab, Felix Gugerli, 2022

Abstract: Rapid human-induced environmental changes like climate warming represent a challenge for forest ecosystems. Due to their biological complexity and the long generation time of their keystone tree species, genetic adaptation in these ecosystems might not be fast enough to keep track with conditions changing at such a fast pace. The study of adaptation to environmental change and its genetic mechanisms is therefore key for ensuring a sustainable support and management of forests. The 4-day conference of the European Research Group EvolTree (https://www.evoltree.eu) on the topic of “Genomics and Adaptation in Forest Ecosystems” brought together over 130 scientists to present and discuss the latest developments and findings in forest evolutionary research. Genomic studies in forest trees have long been hampered by the lack of high-quality genomics resources and affordable genotyping methods. This has dramatically changed in the last few years; the conference impressively showed how such tools are now being applied to study past demography, adaptation and interactions with associated organisms. Moreover, genomic studies are now finally also entering the world of conservation and forest management, for example by measuring the value or cost of interspecific hybridization and introgression, assessing the vulnerability of species and populations to future change, or accurately delineating evolutionary significant units. The newly launched conference series of EvolTree will hopefully play a key role in the exchange and synthesis of such important investigations.
Keywords: gene conservation, genetic diversity, local adaptation, pathogens, selection, mycorrhizal fungi
DiRROS - Published: 18.02.2022; Views: 179; Downloads: 106
.pdf Fulltext (1,04 MB)

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