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1.
Public preferences for the management of different invasive alien forest taxa
Anže Japelj, Jana Kus Veenvliet, Judita Malovrh, Andrej Verlič, Maarten De Groot, 2019

Abstract: Invasive alien species (IAS) require management to mitigate their impact on ecosystems. The success of management decisions often depends on whether they are socially acceptable and to what extent people are willing to be actively involved in an early warning and rapid response system (EWRR). We administered a nation-wide public poll to assess people%s knowledge on plant, insect and fungal IAS; their perception of IAS as an environmental problem; and their support for different IAS management measures. Most respondents (76%) knew the term IAS, and more than half (62%) provided a correct definition. Species with more media attention and those that are easily visible are more frequently identified correctly. Almost all respondents (97%) support an EWRR system; however, there is heterogeneity in terms of the types of actions people approve of. Non-lethal measures garner more support than lethal ones. Gender and previous knowledge also affect the level of agreement. The willingness-to-pay question largely confirmed this, as people were divided into four classes according to their preferences for either biological, mechanical or chemical measures to control IAS; completeness and location of removal; and having an EWRR established. Mechanical removal is the most preferred treatment in two of the four classes, and complete removal is preferred over partial removal in one of the four classes. Having an EWRR is consistently supported in all classes, and removal in urban areas is preferred over removal in forestland in only one class.
Keywords: Early warning and rapid response system, public attitudes, management measures, alien insects, alien plants, alien fungi
DiRROS - Published: 12.07.2019; Views: 1971; Downloads: 1001
.pdf Fulltext (1,86 MB)

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Insect pathogens with special reference to pathogens of bark beetles (COL. Solytidae: Ips typographus L.) : preliminary results of isolation of entomopathogenic fungi from two spruce bark beetles in Slovenia
Maja Jurc, 2004

Abstract: This paper deals with the most important groups of insect pathogens, i.e. viruses, bacteria, fungi, nematodes and protozoans (microsporidia). We describe their basic characteristics, virulence, method of infecting or attackon the host, signs of illnesses in an affected host, pathogen survival in the outside environment, and the use of bioticcontrol of economically damaging insects. Particular importance is placed on bark beetle pathogens, which have been found in natural populations of hosts, particularly in the large spruce bark beetle (Scolytidae: Ips typographus L.). We also present ourexperience in studying entomopathogenic fungi on the species Dryocoetes autographus and Orthotomicus laricis in Slovenia.
Keywords: beetles pathogens, entomopathogenic fungi, biocontrol agents, insect pathogens
DiRROS - Published: 12.07.2017; Views: 2880; Downloads: 1184
.pdf Fulltext (734,75 KB)

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Root-associated fungal communities from two phenologically contrasting Silver Fir (Abies alba Mill.) groups of trees
Tina Unuk, Tijana Martinović, Domen Finžgar, Nataša Šibanc, Tine Grebenc, Hojka Kraigher, 2019

Abstract: Root-associated fungal communities are important components in ecosystem processes, impacting plant growth and vigor by influencing the quality, direction, and flow of nutrients and water between plants and fungi. Linkages of plant phenological characteristics with belowground root-associated fungal communities have rarely been investigated, and thus our aim was to search for an interplay between contrasting phenology of host ectomycorrhizal trees from the same location and root-associated fungal communities (ectomycorrhizal, endophytic, saprotrophic and pathogenic rootassociated fungi) in young and in adult silver fir trees. The study was performed in a managed silver fir forest site. Twenty-four soil samples collected under two phenologically contrasting silver fir groups were analyzed for differences in rootassociated fungal communities using Illumina sequencing of a total root-associated fungal community. Significant differences in beta diversity and in mean alpha diversity were confirmed for overall community of ectomycorrhizal root-associated fungi, whereas for ecologically different non-ectomycorrhizal root-associated fungal communities the differences were significant only for beta diversity and not for mean alpha diversity. At genus level root-associated fungal communities differed significantly between early and late flushing young and adult silver fir trees. We discuss the interactions through which the phenology of host plants either drives or is driven by the root-associated fungal communities in conditions of a sustainably co-naturally managed silver fir forest.
Keywords: host phenology, stand age, root-associated fungi, silver fir, fungal community
DiRROS - Published: 20.02.2020; Views: 1404; Downloads: 1034
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The effect of Eutypella parasitica on the wood decay of three maple species
Nikica Ogris, Jožica Gričar, Miha Humar, Barbara Piškur, Ana Brglez, 2020

Abstract: Eutypella parasitica R.W. Davidson & R.C. Lorenz is the causative agent of Eutypella canker of maple, a destructive disease of maples in Europe and North America. The fungus E. parasitica is known to cause wood stain and decay. However, it is not known how effectively it decomposes the wood of the most widespread maple species in Europe. Wood samples of Acer pseudoplatanus L., A. platanoides L., and A. campestre L. were exposed to four isolates of E. parasitica and nine other fungal species for comparison, according to the modified EN 113 standard. After 15 weeks of incubation, mass loss and microscopical analysis of samples showed evidence of colonization and different wood decay potentials among fungal species. A highly significant positive correlation was found between mass loss and moisture content for all fungal species. Similarly, the measured cell wall thickness correlated well with the calculated mass loss of the samples. On average, the fungal species caused the lowest mass loss in A. pseudoplatanus (10.0%) and the highest in A. campestre (12.6%) samples. Among the samples exposed to E. parasitica isolates, the highest mass loss was recorded in A. pseudoplatanus (6.6%). Statistical analysis showed significant differences in mass loss and moisture content between different E. parasitica isolates. Based on the results of staining, we discuss the type of decay caused by E. parasitica. Although E. parasitica isolates caused smaller mass loss of samples compared to other more effective decay species, we should not disregard its capability of degrading maple wood. Because E. parasitica usually infects the lower portion of the trunk, which is the largest and most valuable part of the tree, any damage can cause significant economic and resource loss.
Keywords: wood decay, mass loss, moisture content, mini-block test, decay test, Acer spp., Eutypella parasitica, fungi, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy
DiRROS - Published: 13.07.2020; Views: 1100; Downloads: 717
.pdf Fulltext (8,28 MB)

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The lichens of the Ždrocle forest reserve
Johannes Prügger, Boštjan Surina, Helmut Mayrhofer, 2000

Abstract: 88 lichenized and 2 lichenicolous fungi are reported from the @drocle Forest Reserve. The association Ranunculo platanifolii-Fagetum var. geogr. Calaminthagrandiflora hosts the greatest biodiversity of lichens. One species (Biatora flavopunctata) is new for the flora of Slovenia, two species (Collemafurfuraceum and Lecanora subintricata) and one variety (Cladonia macilenta ssp. floerkeana) are new for the dinaric phytogeographical region.
Keywords: flora, lichens, lichenicolus fungi, distribution, biodiversity, forest reserve
DiRROS - Published: 17.11.2020; Views: 739; Downloads: 243
.pdf Fulltext (1,14 MB)

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