Digital repository of Slovenian research organisations

Search the repository
A+ | A- | Help | SLO | ENG

Query: search in
search in
search in
search in
Research data

Options:
  Reset

Query: "fulltext" AND "organization" (Science and Research Centre Koper) .

1 - 10 / 13
First pagePrevious page12Next pageLast page
1.
Globally altered sleep patterns and physical activity levels by confinement in 5056 individuals : ECLB COVID-19 international online survey
Khaled Trabelsi, Achraf Ammar, Liwa Masmoudi, Omar Boukhris, Hamdi Chtourou, Bassem Bouaziz, Michael Brach, Boštjan Šimunič, Rado Pišot, Saša Pišot, 2021

Abstract: Symptoms of psychological distress and disorder have been widely reported in people under quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic; in addition to severe disruption of peoples% daily activity and sleep patterns. This study investigates the association between physical-activity levels and sleep patterns in quarantined individuals. An international Google online survey was launched in April 6th, 2020 for 12-weeks. Forty-one research organizations from Europe, North-Africa, Western-Asia, and the Americas promoted the survey through their networks to the general society, which was made available in 14 languages. The survey was presented in a differential format with questions related to responses %before% and %during% the confinement period. Participants responded to the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire and the short form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. 5056 replies (59.4% female), from Europe (46.4%), Western-Asia (25.4%), America (14.8%) and North-Africa (13.3%) were analysed. The COVID-19 home confinement led to impaired sleep quality, as evidenced by the increase in the global PSQI score (4.37 % 2.71 before home confinement vs. 5.32 % 3.23 during home confinement) (p < 0.001). The frequency of individuals experiencing a good sleep decreased from 61% (n = 3063) before home confinement to 48% (n = 2405) during home confinement with highly active individuals experienced better sleep quality (p < 0.001) in both conditions. Time spent engaged in all physical-activity and the metabolic equivalent of task in each physical-activity category (i.e., vigorous, moderate, walking) decreased significantly during COVID-19 home confinement (p < 0.001). The number of hours of daily-sitting increased by ~2 hours/days during home confinement (p < 0.001). COVID-19 home confinement resulted in significantly negative alterations in sleep patterns and physical-activity levels. To maintain health during home confinement, physical-activity promotion and sleep hygiene education and support are strongly warranted.
Keywords: coronavirus, COVID-19, pandemic, public health, restrictions, isolation, home confinement, psychosocial health, sleep, sedentary lifestyle, physical activities, lifestyle, behaviours
DiRROS - Published: 24.03.2021; Views: 38; Downloads: 26
.pdf Fulltext (408,87 KB)

2.
Absence of an aging-related increase in fibre type grouping in athletes and non-athletes
Mathew Piasecki, Guy A. M. Messa, Joern Rittweger, Jamie McPhee, Erika Koltai, Zsolt Radak, Boštjan Šimunič, Ari Heinonen, Harri Suominen, Marko T. Korhonen, Hans Degens, 2020

Abstract: The ageing-related loss of muscle mass is thought to be partly attributable to motor neuron loss and motor unit remodelling that result in fibre type grouping. We examined fibre type grouping in 19- to 85-year-old athletes and non-athletes and evaluated to which extent any observed grouping is explained by the fibre type composition of the muscle. Since regular physical activity may stimulate reinnervation, we hypothesised that fibre groups are larger in master athletes than in age-matched non-athletes. Fibre type grouping was assessed in m. vastus lateralis biopsies from 22 young (19-27 years) and 35 healthy older (66-82 years) non-athletes, and 14 young (20-29 years), 51 middle-aged (38%65 years) and 31 older (66-85 years) athletes. An "enclosed fibre" was any muscle fibre of a particular type surrounded by fibres of the same type only. A fibre type group was defined as a group of fibres with at least one enclosed fibre. Only type II fibre cross-sectional area (FCSA) showed an age-related decline that was greater in athletes (p < 0.001) than in non-athletes (p = 0.012). There was no significant age-related effect on fibre group size or fibre group number in athletes or non-athletes, and the observed grouping was similar to that expected from the fibre type composition. At face value these observations do 1) neither show evidence for an age-related loss and remodelling of motor units nor 2) improved reinnervation with regular physical activity, but 3) histological examination may not reveal the full extent of ageing-related motor unit remodelling.
Keywords: aging, denervation, fibre type, reinnervation, vastus lateralis
DiRROS - Published: 24.03.2021; Views: 38; Downloads: 24
.pdf Fulltext (936,83 KB)

3.
Additional exergames to regular tennis training improves cognitive-motor functions of children but may temporarily affect tennis technique : a single-blind randomized controlled trial
Luka Šlosar, Eling D. de Bruin, Eduardo Bodnariuc Fontes, Matej Plevnik, Rado Pišot, Boštjan Šimunič, Uroš Marušič, 2021

Abstract: This study evaluated the effects of an exergame program (TennisVirtua-4, Playstation Kinect) combined with traditional tennis training on autonomic regulation, tennis technique, gross motor skills, clinical reaction time, and cognitive inhibitory control in children. Sixty-three children were randomized into four groups (1st % two exergame and two regular trainings sessions/week, 2nd % one exergame and one regular training sessions/week, 3rd % two regular trainings sessions/week, and 4th % one regular training session/week) and compared at baseline, 6-month immediately post intervention and at 1-year follow-up post intervention. At 6-month post intervention the combined exergame and regular training sessions revealed: higher breathing frequency, heart rate (all ps % 0.001) and lower skin conductance levels (p = 0.001) during exergaming; additional benefits in the point of contact and kinetic chain elements of the tennis forehand and backhand technique (all ps % 0.001); negative impact on the shot preparation and the follow-through elements (all ps % 0.017); higher ball skills (as part of the gross motor skills) (p < 0.001); higher percentages of clinical reaction time improvement (1st %9.7% vs 3rd group %7.4% and 2nd %6.6% vs 4th group %4.4%, all ps % 0.003) and cognitive inhibitory control improvement in both congruent (1st %20.5% vs 3rd group %18.4% and 2nd %11.5% vs 4th group %9.6%, all ps % 0.05) and incongruent (1st group %19.1% vs 3rd group %12.5% and 2nd group %11.4% vs 4th group %6.5%, all ps % 0.001) trials. The 1-year follow-up test showed no differences in the tennis technique, clinical reaction time and cognitive inhibitory control improvement between groups with the same number of trainings per week. The findings support exergaming as an additional training tool, aimed to improve important cognitive-motor tennis skills by adding dynamics to the standardized training process. Caution should be placed to planning this training, e.g., in a mesocycle, since exergaming might decrease the improvement of specific tennis technique parts of the trainees. (ClinicalTrials.gov; ID: NCT03946436).
Keywords: tennis, training, performance, children, motor learning, cognitive learning, teaching, strategies
DiRROS - Published: 17.03.2021; Views: 48; Downloads: 34
.pdf Fulltext (1,81 MB)

4.
A cross-country examination on the fear of COVID-19 and the sense of loneliness during the first wave of COVID-19 outbreak
Patrik Drid, Saša Pišot, Gianluca Lo Coco, Ambra Gentile, Ksenja Bosnar, Ivana Milovanović, Antonino Bianco, 2021

Abstract: The aim of the current study is to examine gender, age. and cross-country differences in fear of COVID-19 and sense of loneliness during the lockdown, by comparing people from those countries with a high rate of infections and deaths (e.g., Spain and Italy) and from countries with a mild spread of infection (e.g., Croatia, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Bosnia and Herzegovina). A total of 3876 participants (63% female) completed an online survey on %Everyday life practices in COVID-19 time% in April 2020, including measures of fear of COVID-19 and loneliness. Males and females of all age groups in countries suffering from the powerful impact of the COVID-19 pandemic reported greater fear of COVID-19 and sense of loneliness. In less endangered countries, females and the elderly reported more symptoms than males and the young; in Spanish and Italian samples, the pattern of differences is considerably more complex. Future research should thoroughly examine different age and gender groups. The analysis of emotional well-being in groups at risk of mental health issues may help to lessen the long term social and economic costs due to the COVID-19 outbreak.
Keywords: coronavirus, COVID-19, pandemic, public health, restrictions, isolation, loneliness, fear, psychosocial distress
DiRROS - Published: 15.03.2021; Views: 39; Downloads: 26
.pdf Fulltext (606,81 KB)

5.
Decrease in cellular nanovesicles concentration in blood of athletes more than 15 hours after marathon
Mojca Benčina, Apolonija Bedina Zavec, Damjana Drobne, Mitja Drab, Zala Jan, Barbara Drašler, Matej Hočevar, Judita Lea Krek, Ljubiša Pađen, Manca Pajnič, Neža Repar, Boštjan Šimunič, Roman Štukelj, Veronika Kralj-Iglič, 2021

Abstract: Introduction: Cellular nanovesicles (CNVs), that are shed from cells, have been recognized as promising indicators of health status. We analyzed the effect of long-distance running on concentration of CNVs, along with some standard blood parameters, in 27 athletes two days before and > 15 hours after physical effort. Methods: CNVs were isolated by repetitive centrifugation and washing of samples, and assessed by flow cytometry. Cholinesterase (ChE) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity were measured spectrophotometrically. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-% (TNF-%) concentrations were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). C-reactive protein (CRP) was measured with immunoturbidimetric determination and lipidogram parameters were measured by enzymatic colorimetric assay. Flow cytometry was used for blood cell count and mean platelet volume (MPV) measurement. Results: More than 15 hours after physical effort a decrease was found in CNVs% concentration in isolates from blood (46%; p< 0.05), in ChE activity in whole blood (47%; p< 0.001), in plasma (34%; p< 0.01), and in erythrocyte suspension (54%; p< 0.001), as well as in GST activity in erythrocyte suspension (16%; p< 0.01) and in IL-6 concentration in plasma (63%; p< 0.05). We found no change in GST activity in plasma and in TNF-% concentration in plasma. Correlations (> 0.8; p< 0.001) between CNVs% concentration and ChE activity, and GST activity, respectively, in erythrocyte suspension were found. Conclusion: We found that > 15 hours post-physical effort, CNVs% concentration was below the initial value, concomitant with other measured parameters: ChE and GST activity as well as IL-6 concentration, indicating a favorable effect of physical effort on health status. CNVs% concentration and ChE activity in isolates from peripheral blood proved to have potential as indicators of the response of the human body to inflammation after physical effort. Physical activity should be considered as an important factor in preparation of subjects for blood sampling in procedures focusing on CNV-containing diagnostic and therapeutic compounds.
Keywords: membrane vesiculation, physical effort, blood samples, inflammation process, cellular nanovesicles, marathon
DiRROS - Published: 25.01.2021; Views: 139; Downloads: 111
.pdf Fulltext (1,88 MB)

6.
Physical activity drops during summer holidays for 6- to 9-year-old children
Tadeja Volmut, Rado Pišot, Jurij Planinšec, Boštjan Šimunič, 2021

Abstract: Regular physical activity (PA) reduces the health risk of childhood obesity and associated chronic diseases as well as mental health problems. Since PA declines as children age as well with future generations it is of highest importance to intervene in school and out-of-school settings. Out-of-school periods affect children's PA as it is mainly left to the interest and motivation of their parents. We compared accelerometer-based PA patterns in 93 6- to 9-year old children assessed four times: before (May/June), during (August), and after (September) summer holidays and at a 1-year follow up (May/June). Before summer holidays children were assessed also for anthropometry and motor tests. During summer holidays overall PA decreased by 18% (p < 0.001), physical inactivity increased by 5.5% (p < 0.001), moderate PA decreased by 53% (p < 0.001) and moderate to vigorous PA decreased by 45% (p < 0.001) when compared to before summer holidays. Furthermore, overall PA remained diminished also after summer holidays by 8.8% (p = 0.001) but recovered to baseline values at 1-year follow up. About 30% of overall PA and moderate to vigorous PA decrease during summer holidays could be explained by children's fitness level as a greater decrease was found in children with better results in standing long jump and 300-meter running time. Our finding detects an alarming summer holiday decrease in children PA that should not be neglected in future studies and intervention designs.
Keywords: MVPA, children, vacations, physical inactivity, sedentary behavior, accelerometer
DiRROS - Published: 19.01.2021; Views: 138; Downloads: 170
.pdf Fulltext (416,68 KB)

7.
The effect of olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) infestation on certain chemical parameters of produced olive oils
Vasilij Valenčič, Bojan Butinar, Maja Podgornik, Milena Bučar-Miklavčič, 2021

Abstract: Olives affected by active and damaging infestation (olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae (Rossi)) were assayed for their chemical composition. Biophenols were determined by HPLC, sterols, triterpenic dialcohols, and fatty acids by gas chromatography analysis. The acquired data were statistically analyzed. Oils produced from %Istrska belica% fruit affected by active infestation compared to the oils made from fruit affected by damaging infestation showed higher amounts of total oleuropein biofenols (377.3 versus (vs.) 106.6 mg/kg), total biophenols (755 vs. 377 mg/kg), lignans (85.3 vs. 32.9mg/kg), the dialdehydic formof decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycone (DMO-AgldA) (148.3 vs. 49.0 mg/kg), its oxidized form (DMO-Agl-dA)ox (35.2 vs. 8.5 mg/kg), the dialdehydic form of oleuropein aglycone (O-Agl-dA) (61.1 vs. 8.0 mg/kg), the dialdehydic form of ligstroside aglycone (L-Agl-dA) (63.5 vs. 28.0 mg/kg), the aldehydic form of oleuropein aglycone (O-Agl-A) (40.6 vs. 8.4 mg/kg), and lower amounts of tyrosol (Tyr) (6.0 vs. 13. 9 mg/kg) and the aldehydic form of ligstroside aglycone (L-Agl-A) (13.8 vs. 40.3 mg/kg). Higher values of stigmasterol (2.99%) and lower values of campesterol (2.25%) were determined in oils affected by damaging infestation; an increase in triterpenic dialcohols was also observed (3.04% for damaging and 1.62% for active infestation). Oils affected by damaging infestation, compared to active infestation, showed lower amounts of oleic acid (73.89 vs. 75.15%) and higher amounts of myristic (0.013 vs. 0.011%), linoleic (7.27 vs. 6.48%), and linolenic (0.74 vs. 0.61%) acids.
Keywords: olives, Istrska belica, olive fruit fly, biophenols, sterols, triterpenic dialcohols, fatty acids
DiRROS - Published: 13.01.2021; Views: 157; Downloads: 232
.pdf Fulltext (4,01 MB)

8.
Effects of home confinement on mental health and lifestyle behaviours during the COVID-19 outbreak : insights from the ECLB-COVID19 multicentre study
Saša Pišot, Rado Pišot, Boštjan Šimunič, Bassem Bouaziz, Liwa Masmoudi, Omar Boukhris, Hamdi Chtourou, Michael Brach, Khaled Trabelsi, Achraf Ammar, 2021

Abstract: Although recognised as effective measures to curb the spread of the COVID-19 outbreak, social distancing and self-isolation have been suggested to generate a burden throughout the population. To provide scientific data to help identify risk factors for the psychosocial strain during the COVID-19 outbreak, an international cross-disciplinary online survey was circulated in April 2020. This report outlines the mental, emotional and behavioural consequences of COVID-19 home confinement. The ECLB-COVID19 electronic survey was designed by a steering group of multidisciplinary scientists, following a structured review of the literature. The survey was uploaded and shared on the Google online survey platform and was promoted by thirty-five research organizations from Europe, North Africa, Western Asia and the Americas. Questions were presented in a differential format with questions related to responses %before% and %during% the confinement period. 1047 replies (54% women) from Western Asia (36%), North Africa (40%), Europe (21%) and other continents (3%) were analysed. The COVID-19 home confinement evoked a negative effect on mental wellbeing and emotional status (P < 0.001; 0.43 % d % 0.65) with a greater proportion of individuals experiencing psychosocial and emotional disorders (+10% to +16.5%). These psychosocial tolls were associated with unhealthy lifestyle behaviours with a greater proportion of individuals experiencing (i) physical (+15.2%) and social (+71.2%) inactivity, (ii) poor sleep quality (+12.8%), (iii) unhealthy diet behaviours (+10%), and (iv) unemployment (6%). Conversely, participants demonstrated a greater use (+15%) of technology during the confinement period. These findings elucidate the risk of psychosocial strain during the COVID-19 home confinement period and provide a clear remit for the urgent implementation of technology-based intervention to foster an Active and Healthy Confinement Lifestyle AHCL).
Keywords: coronavirus, COVID-19, pandemic, public health, restrictions, isolation, home confinement, psychosocial health, mental wellbeing, depression, satisfaction, lifestyle, behaviours
DiRROS - Published: 18.12.2020; Views: 225; Downloads: 118
.pdf Fulltext (732,17 KB)

9.
Psychological consequences of COVID-19 home confinement : the ECLB-COVID19 multicenter study
Achraf Ammar, Patrick Mueller, Khaled Trabelsi, Hamdi Chtourou, Omar Boukhris, Liwa Masmoudi, Bassem Bouaziz, Michael Brach, Marlen Schmicker, Boštjan Šimunič, Rado Pišot, 2020

Abstract: Background Public health recommendations and government measures during the COVID-19 pandemic have enforced restrictions on daily-living. While these measures are imperative to abate the spreading of COVID-19, the impact of these restrictions on mental health and emotional wellbeing is undefined. Therefore, an international online survey (ECLB-COVID19) was launched on April 6, 2020 in seven languages to elucidate the impact of COVID-19 restrictions on mental health and emotional wellbeing. Methods The ECLB-COVID19 electronic survey was designed by a steering group of multidisciplinary scientists, following a structured review of the literature. The survey was uploaded and shared on the Google online-survey-platform and was promoted by thirty-five research organizations from Europe, North-Africa, Western-Asia and the Americas. All participants were asked for their mental wellbeing (SWEMWS) and depressive symptoms (SMFQ) with regard to %during% and %before% home confinement. Results Analysis was conducted on the first 1047 replies (54% women) from Asia (36%), Africa (40%), Europe (21%) and other (3%). The COVID-19 home confinement had a negative effect on both mental-wellbeing and on mood and feelings. Specifically, a significant decrease (p < .001 and %% = 9.4%) in total score of the SWEMWS questionnaire was noted. More individuals (+12.89%) reported a low mental wellbeing %during% compared to %before% home confinement. Furthermore, results from the mood and feelings questionnaire showed a significant increase by 44.9% (p < .001) in SMFQ total score with more people (+10%) showing depressive symptoms %during% compared to %before% home confinement. Conclusion The ECLB-COVID19 survey revealed an increased psychosocial strain triggered by the home confinement. To mitigate this high risk of mental disorders and to foster an Active and Healthy Confinement Lifestyle (AHCL), a crisis-oriented interdisciplinary intervention is urgently needed.
Keywords: coronavirus, COVID-19, pandemic, public health, restrictions, isolation, home confinement, psychosocial health, psychological consequences, mental health, emotions, wellbeing, physical inactivity
DiRROS - Published: 18.12.2020; Views: 233; Downloads: 180
.pdf Fulltext (598,03 KB)

10.
COVID-19 home confinement negatively impacts social participation and life satisfaction : a worldwide multicenter study
Achraf Ammar, Hamdi Chtourou, Omar Boukhris, Khaled Trabelsi, Liwa Masmoudi, Michael Brach, Bassem Bouaziz, Ellen Bentlage, Daniella How, Mona Ahmed, Boštjan Šimunič, Rado Pišot, Saša Pišot, 2020

Abstract: Public health recommendations and governmental measures during the new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic have enforced numerous restrictions on daily living including social distancing, isolation, and home confinement. While these measures are imperative to mitigate spreading of COVID-19, the impact of these restrictions on psychosocial health is undefined. Therefore, an international online survey was launched in April 2020 to elucidate the behavioral and lifestyle consequences of COVID-19 restrictions. This report presents the preliminary results from more than one thousand responders on social participation and life satisfaction. Methods: Thirty-five research organizations from Europe, North-Africa, Western Asia, and the Americas promoted the survey through their networks to the general society, in 7 languages (English, German, French, Arabic, Spanish, Portuguese, and Slovenian). Questions were presented in a differential format with questions related to responses "before" and "during" confinement conditions. Results: 1047 participations (54% women) from Asia (36%), Africa (40%), Europe (21%), and others (3%) were included in the analysis. Findings revealed psychosocial strain during the enforced COVID-19 home confinement. Large decreases (p < 0.001) in the amount of social activity through family (%58%), friends/neighbors (%44.9%), or entertainment (%46.7%) were triggered by the enforced confinement. These negative effects on social participation were also associated with lower life satisfaction (%30.5%) during the confinement period. Conversely, the social contact score through digital technologies significantly increased (p < 0.001) during the confinement period with more individuals (+24.8%) being socially connected through digital technology. Conclusion: These preliminary findings elucidate the risk of psychosocial strain during the early COVID-19 home confinement period in 2020. Therefore, in order to mitigate the negative psychosocial effects of home confinement, implementation of national strategies focused on promoting social inclusion through a technology-based solution is strongly suggested.
Keywords: coronavirus, COVID-19, pandemic, public health, restrictions, isolation, home confinement, social participation, life satisfaction
DiRROS - Published: 18.12.2020; Views: 210; Downloads: 131
.pdf Fulltext (400,20 KB)

Search done in 0 sec.
Back to top